Author Archives: Keila Guimaraes

7 grants to close the gender gap in STEM

PA Scholarships

Women are a minority when it comes to technology. Aware of the gender gap in the sector, companies, schools and nonprofit organizations are partnering to offer scholarships to women as a way to boost diversity and female representation in the STEM industry.

Project Ada has done a roundup of scholarships and grants that are accepting applications in the next months for women interested from learning the basics of programming to specializing in data science and engineering.   

Women Who Code + Hackbright Academy

WWC and the engineering school for women Hackbright Academy have partnered to offer scholarships to the course Introduction to Programming. The 12-week programme is an introduction for beginners who want to learn to code and to explore software engineering. The scholarship covers the US$3,000 course tuition fee.

Where: San Francisco, US
Deadline: June 15th
How to apply: fill in this form  

Atlassian Scholarship

This scholarship is offered by both software company Atlassian and coding school Galvanize. They are both offering four $5,000 scholarships to the Galvanize Full Stack Web Development program dedicated to Black, Latina, and Indigenous women who want to build their technical skills. Open to residents outside the U.S.

Where: Austin (Texas) or San Francisco (California)
Deadline: applications due 3 weeks before course start date. Drop an e-mail to admissions@galvanize.com for more details
How to apply: fill in this form

IBM Women in Data Science Award

The scholarship is dedicated to women applying to or who have been accepted to the courses Galvanize Data Science, Galvanize Data Engineering, or GalvanizeU Masters of Science in Data Science at the US-based coding school Galvanize. In partnership with IBM, $150,000 will be made available in tuition assistance for female data scientists and data engineers. Courses start in August and September, depending on location.

Where: Austin, Boulder, Denver, Fort Collins, Phoenix, San Francisco and Seattle
Deadline: applications due 3 weeks before course start date
How to apply: fill in this form 

ThoughtWorks scholarship

This scholarship aims to teach women how to code in 12 weeks. The sponsorship is being offered by ThoughtWorks in partnership with Makers Academy. The full 16-week programme costs £8,000 but is free to the six winners of the scholarship. Applicants will need to commit three months full time to the course from either 15th August 2016 or 26th September 2016. There is the potential of a position at ThoughtWorks at the end of the programme.

Where: London, UK
How to apply: applicants can register their interest at this link 

try! Swift conference

This scholarship to the New York conference try! Swift is being offered to underrepresented groups in the tech industry, including women. The financial aid is being sponsored by Instagram, Meetup, Twitter, Technically Speaking, and Swift Studies. The candidates must be able to attend the conference on September 1st and 2nd. The scholarship covers the conference ticket. Breakfast, lunch, and snacks will be provided to all conference attendees during the conference. It doesn’t cover travel expenses.

Where: New York City
Deadline: June 17th
How to apply: fill in this form 

Google Travel and Conference Grants

This scholarship by Google aims to encourage attendance to conferences in Computer Sciences and related fields by underrepresented groups in the technology industry, including women. The grant, provided to North American and European residents, provides free conference registration to selected candidates. North Americans residents will also receive US$500 post-conference reimbursement to retroactively be used toward airfare and accommodation costs. European residents will receive up to €1,000 towards travel and accommodation costs. Grants for Europe are exclusively dedicated to women in technology.

Where: North America and Europe
Deadline: list of deadlines for North America is here and for Europe is here
How to apply: North Americans fill in this form | Europeans fill in this one

2016 Grace Hopper conference

Google is offering grants to the 2016 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Conference taking place in Houston, Texas from October 19 – 21, 2016. The sponsorship is for students and industry professionals from North America. Grants include conference registration, round trip flight to Houston, arranged hotel accommodations from October 18-22, US$75 reimbursement for miscellaneous travel costs and a social event with fellow travel grant recipients.

Where: Houston, Texas
Deadline: July 10th
How to apply: fill in this form
*Residents from outside North America can apply for grants to the GHC conference here

Picture credits to “© European Union 2013 – European Parliament“.

4 events for women in tech in São Paulo

WIT - Brasil

The women in tech community in São Paulo is thriving, with events and meetups for ladies interested in networking, in entrepreneurship and in coding.

Project Ada has done a selection of upcoming events for women in tech who happen to be in São Paulo in the next few weeks:

Hacker Culture & Feminism 

This workshop by MariaLab, a feminist hackerspace in São Paulo, will cover the ethics of hacker culture under a feminist point of view. The workshop will also cover tools and techniques for digital security and cryptography.

When: Sunday, 29th May
Where: Deputado Emílio Carlos Avenue, 3641. Vila Nova Cachoeirinha, São Paulo – SP
Cost: Free

Progra{Maria}

The project, which aims to empower girls through coding, is offering a 9-weeks programming course, which will cover the basics of HTML, CSS and JavaScript. The course will also offer talks on entrepreneurship, hacker culture and logic.

When: every Saturday between 11th June and 6th August
Where: FIAP Aclimação: Lins de Vasconcelos Avenue, 1222. Aclimação, São Paulo – SP
Cost: R$ 160,00 [£30]
Scholarship? Yes, there will be no charge for 10 selected attendees who can’t afford the investment.

Women TechMakers São Paulo

This meetup, in partnership with Google Developers Group São Paulo, is part of a series of events to support the development of women in technology. The event is not exclusively for women, but there will be more places for women to encourage female participation. RSVP will open on 31th May on the group’s Meetup page.

When: Wednesday, 15th June
Where: Google Campus SP: Coronel Oscar Porto Street, 70. Paraíso, São Paulo – SP
Cost: Free

Let’s understand UX (Vamos entender UX)

This workshop is for designers and developers interested in user experience design. The course will cover the practical aspects of improving user satisfaction through usability and accessibility by presenting useful tools and essential steps for projects focused on UX design.

When: Thursday, 16th June
Where: Engenheiro José Sá Rocha Street, 173. Vila Mariana, São Paulo – SP.
Cost: R$ 97 [£20]

7 scholarships and grants for women in tech

money

It is widely known that women are underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, both in the academic world and in the market place.

Some initiatives, from the private sector, independent institutions and universities, try to tackle the gender gap in the STEM industry by providing financial support for women who show a passion for the hard sciences.

Project Ada has selected seven funding opportunities that are or will be open soon for submissions in the UK and abroad. If you are a woman in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, you may be eligible to one of these scholarships and grants:

1. Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship is aimed to fund female students in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, informatics or a closely related technical field. In the 2015-2016 academic year, the program awarded a € 7,000 award for the year.

Winners are awarded scholarships based on the strength of each candidate’s academic background, passion for increasing the involvement of women in computer science, and demonstrated leadership.

Award: a € 7,000 award for the year
Requirements: to apply it is necessary to intend to be enrolled in or accepted as a full-time student in a Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD program at a university in Europe, the Middle East or Africa.
Application date: open in Autumn 2015
More detailshttp://www.google.com/anitaborg

2. Most promising female applicant (STEM courses)

This generous scholarship by Bournemouth University, of a £9,000 tuition fee waiver, will be awarded to the most promising UK female applicant applying for a full-time undergraduate STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) course offered at BU.

Award: a £9,000 tuition fee waiver
Requirements: Be a female applicant for a full-time STEM subject undergraduate course delivered at Bournemouth University
Application date: close by 31 August 2015.
More detailshttp://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/futurestudents/undergraduate/funding/vc-scholarship-stem.html

3. Level Up

If you are looking for an opportunity to study in the US, this might be a good one. Level up fellowship is targeted for individuals from low-income backgrounds who have shown a passion for technology and a strong commitment to build a career in tech.

To apply, the candidate has to be referred by one of the following institutions: YerUp, Women Who Code, Npower, Per Scholas and Northern Virginia Family Service (NVFS).

Requirements: The program is for candidates accepted into Web Development Immersive (WDI) and User Design Experience Immersive (UXDI) courses in in New York City, San Francisco, or Washington DC.
Next deadline: 29 April for WDI in New York. 29 April for UXDI in NYC, SF and DC.
More details: https://generalassemb.ly/opportunity-fund/fellowships/level-up

4. Top entrepreneurship program with Draper University

The programme offers a seven-week Silicon Valley live-in entrepreneurship program for entrepreneurs aged 18-28 from all over the world.

The university has created more than 100 startups that have raised more than US$ 10 million, funded by investors including Marc Andreessen, Tim Draper, and Marc Benioff.

Award: The university provides one US$ 5.000 scholarship for women in STEM and one full scholarship for Women Who Code members.
Requirements: be an entrepreneur aged 18-28.
Application date: the second round for applications closes 1 May.
More details: http://draperuniversity.com

5. Delphix Technology Scholarship for Women

Delphix, the software company based in Palo Alto, California (US), is hosting a coding competition to get more women inside the company. The initiative is to help company to create a more diverse team. As the company says:

“At Delphix we believe that the best products are built by a diverse team of great engineers.”

Award: the winner receives $5,000 to be used toward tuition fee
Requirements: full-time college students pursuing a technical degree like computer science, mathematics, information technology, applied mathematics, electrical engineering etc in the US.
Application date: open from June 1, 2015 until November 15, 2015. Winner will be announced on December 11, 2015.
More details: http://scholarship.delphix.com

6. Conference: Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

Grace Hopper Celebration is awarding scholarships for its conference, the world’s largest technical conference for women in computing. The event is on Oct 14-16th, 2015 in Houston, Texas.

Undergraduate, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows from around the world are encouraged to apply.

Award: The GHC Scholarship Grants for students typically cover all expenses for attending the conferencing including conference registration, meals, lodging, and fixed amount of travel reimbursement funds.
Application date: close on Wednesday, April 15th
More details: http://anitaborg.org/awards-grants/ghc-scholarship-grants/

7. The Anita Borg Systers Pass-It-On (PIO) Awards

This award provides small grants for women over 18. According to the organisation, the awards “honour Anita Borg’s desire to create a network of  women technologists helping one another”.

The cash awards are intended as a means for women established in technological fields to support women seeking their place in the fields of technology. The program is called “Pass-It-On” because it comes with the moral obligation to “pass on” the benefits gained from the award.

Awards: open to women in all countries and range from US$ 500 to US$ 1000.
Requirements: any woman over 18 years old in or aspiring to be in the fields of computing can apply. Click here for details of projects accepted for grants.
Application date: 22 April 2015.

(Featured image: Anita Borg (January 17, 1949 – April 6, 2003), American computer scientist. Photo by Ignite. Also, woman making it rain by expresscredit.)

The tech jobs with the highest gender pay gap in the UK

GenderPayGap

As odd as it can be, women and men are not paid equally.

In the UK’s tech industry, female workers earn less than their male colleagues in all jobs, from computer programming to data processing.

According to the ONS’s Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, women’s salaries can be as much as 37 per cent less than men’s.

In the graphic below, it’s possible to see the salary gender gap in seven jobs in the UK tech industry.

The highest gap is seen in the role “data processing and web portals”. While male workers earn £726 per week, women are paid much less, at £457.

Even in computer programming, where the payment difference is the smallest among the jobs analysed, female programmers still make 22 per cent less than men. Women earn £534.70 per week, while men get £689.90.

The graphic below shows that there is no equality in salaries in any job considered in the analysis. Other roles in the survey, such as software designing and computer games, couldn’t be analysed as there was no sufficient data about women’s earnings.

ChartSalaryGap

“Raise awareness”

Earlier this month, the group Girls in Tech launched a campaign to bring awareness to the gender pay gap in the tech industry.

The campaign is a response to the recent comments by Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, who said during an interview in the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference that women should rather trust the system than ask for a raise.

Girls in Tech campaign promises to raise the gender wage gap with companies such as Microsoft, Google, Facebook, IBM, PayPal and others.

Kate Brodock, Girls in Tech president, said:

“By teaching employees how to effectively ask for a raise and creating a system that supports that, we hope to empower those women that are currently hesitant to ask for a raise, and gain productive partners in the participating companies.”

Featured image: credit to European Union 2015 – European Parliament

BattleHack: coding for good in London

DSC01671

Coders and developers gathered together from April 25-26 at BattleHack London, a hackathon that encourages participants to build projects that would have a good impact on society.

On Sunday (26) the groups pitched their ideas to a juror made of names such as Jess Williamson, director of TechStars, Julia Shalet, product doctor at The Mobile Academy, and John Lunn, senior director at Braintree_Dev, a branch of PayPal.

The topics pitched went from helping victims in natural disasters to enhancing urban mobility.

Women in Tech London was represented by team “I am Home Safe” and got a sponsor prize.

The winner was @Risk, for their project focused on elderly people. They developed an app that tracks the routine of elders and make automatic calls to the elder’s emergency contacts.

The team will compete in the finals in November at Silicon Valley, for a chance to win a US$ 100,000 prize.

Check our Storify for a summary of the best ideas presented at the weekend.

A male entrepreneur asks: where are all the women in tech?

GirlsinCoding

It was with genuine interest that a male entrepreneur asked a panel of women in tech, “Where are the female talents in the IT industry?”

The question, asked by someone from the audience during the Girls in Coding event this Thursday, opened the debate about the lack of female applicants in tech jobs and about what companies can do to attract more women.

“I get the diversity speech, but how to get more female tech talent?”, asked the entrepreneur from the audience. “CVs from women are not getting through the door.”

In response Amali de Alwis, CEO from Code First: Girls, a social enterprise that teaches coding for free to young women, said that “a lot can be done by tech companies to get more female applicants. There is work to be done. How are you advertising your jobs? A conscious change is necessary,” she said.

Alexa Glick, global diversity program manager at Microsoft, added:

“How is your job described? Words are so important. Research shows that women look at every skill necessary before applying for a job, while men apply for a job when they meet only 60% of the qualifications. If you say that the successful candidate will need to be ‘100% for the job’, this might scare women, because they might have a family and won’t be able to dedicate 100% of their time.”

The entrepreneur observed that it was fine to attract women to his company’s business area and that the challenge was to get female developers. “In my business area we have a good gender balance, but if you ask me how many women developers are in my company, I say zero.”

The CEO from Code First: Girls noted that the companies also have the responsibility of training people.

“The role of companies is not just to hire the best talents, but also make the right talent.”

The entrepreneur’s question about where are the women in tech is a crucial one. The number of women studying computer science in the UK is dropping: in 2011, only 17.6% of computer science undergraduates were women. The number is less than half of what it was in 1983/4 – when 37.1% of undergrads were women.

Consequently, less women are entering the tech workforce. An analysis by Project Ada has showed that less than one in five UK top tech bosses are women.

Campaign

Getting more women in the tech world is seen as crucial for the future of the industry, said Sinead Bunting, Marketing Director UK and Ireland from Monster, a recruiter company.

“Recently Martha Lane-Fox said if the internet is for everybody it should reflect that and be built by everyone. But at the moment 98% of the code relied upon by the internet and web technologies is programmed by men,” said Bunting. “We need different people to build apps that will reflect the diversity of the world.”

Earlier this month, Monster launched the Girls in Coding campaign to raise awareness to the issue.

Here is a video of the campaign featuring different initiatives in the UK to get more women into tech:

Here’s the joke that brought #GamerGate back

TimJoke

Months after the critical moment of #GamerGate, described as either a movement about “ethics in game journalism” or misogyny against women in gaming depending on whose side you take, the controversy is back.

The comeback is because of a joke made by Tim Schafer, a critically acclaimed game designer, during a speech at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) last Thursday, when he seemed to mock the movement and its sister hashtag, #notyourshield.

Here is the joke that has brought the movement back again:

Google seemed to enter the debate when its Google Cloud Platform account posted the tweet “The future of gaming is in all of our hands. #GamerGate.”

Later after the post, the company deleted the message and posted a new one saying it did not support the community, which has been under strong controversy over the past months.

Controversy, misogyny and cyberbullying

The popular hashtag #Gamergate, which says to stand against corruption in journalism, has also been accused of misogyny and cyberbullying.

It has started in August 2014 after a developer, Zoe Quinn, who received positive reviews for her new game Depression Quest, released in 2013, was accused by her ex-boyfriend of having had an affair with a journalist, Nathan Grayson, from Kotaku, an influential website in the gaming community.

Despite the fact he had not written about her new enterprise, an extensive discussion emerged under the movement GamerGate about corruption and nepotism in journalism. In the name of the movement, Quinn was doxxed, harassed and received death threats messages. She was a speaker at the GDC conference and talked against harassment and misogyny.

The new wave of tweets after Schafer’s joke indicates that the polemic aroung GamerGate is not gone. The posts on Twitter have also been a window into how the debates around minorities and gender equality bring controversial opinions.

The word “feminazi” also appeared. There were tweets accusing feminists of being too radical:

And there were users who seemed fed up with the fact that the discussion around gender was overshadowing the actual activity of playing games:

The debate took over the Game Developers Conference. The Daily Dot said of the movement:

“It’s a very real threat to the mental and physical well being of game developers and the health of the entire industry.”

Quinn, who spoke at the conference, seemed reluctant to name the movement and referred to GamerGate as the villain in the Harry Potter series “Voldemort”, or “He-who-must-not-be-named”, according to the VentureBeat.

“We need some defense against the dark arts,” she said.

As it happened: Super Women in Tech London

Photo of tweeting birds

Project Ada reported live from Super Women in Tech London, at Twitter’s London headquarters. The event gathered a great panel of tech leaders, discussing the issues that women in the industry face today.

Panelists were Alice Bentinck, co-founder of Code First:Girls and other Silicon Roundabout startups, Madeline Parra, CEO of Twizoo, Robyn Exton, founder of Dattch, and Wendy Orr from Guardian News & Media, and the evening opened Twitter’s mobile developer event Flock London.

SWAT focuses on the advancement of female leadership both within Twitter and in the tech industry. Please bring your questions and join us for a great evening!

 

 

Keila and Clara liveblogged the event below, but you can also keep an eye on the hashtag #SWATLondon.

Live Blog Project Ada: #SWATLondon
 

(Featured image: Cobalt123/Flickr)

The best London meetups for every woman in tech

Brynn Evans, design lead at Google, in an interview  with Women Techmakers

(Photo: Brynn Evans, design lead at Google, during an interview with Google Women Techmakers)

One of the best things about the Internet is how easy it makes for people to gather around a subject and work together. The Internet is great for sharing and for collaboration and meetups are even better for building a face-to-face community.

These meetings can be practical workshops, lightning talks or networking opportunities. For London-based readers, Project Ada has put together a list of five communities and four free meetups we know every tech girl would love to attend.

Here is our selection:

Women Who Code

This professional community gathers more than 20,000 women developers from 15 countries and its goal is to connect 1 million women in tech careers. Its meetup community in London has more than 900 coders and their events are aimed to put developers in touch with companies and to help non-developers who want to learn how to code. The events are exclusively for female participants.

Next event: “An Evening with Salesforce + Lightning Talks“, Wednesday, 25 February.

There will be speakers from the CRM software company Salesforce and lightning talks from guests speakers. Confirmed names include Nicola Aitken, an API integrations engineer at Geckoboard; and Claire Tran, a software engineer. Nicola will be talking about the things she wishes she had known before she started her first developer job. Claire will look into some techniques that can be applied to Ruby on Rails app.

Super Women at Twitter

The group, under the acronym SWAT, says its goal is to share content and resources to empower women to be leaders in the workforce around the world. You can stay updated with their work and events here.

Next event: “Super Women in Tech London“, Wednesday, 18th February.

A panel of tech leaders that will share their experiences and thoughts on issues faced by women in the industry. Some of the panelists are Alice Bentinck, co-founder of Entrepreneur First and Code First:Girls; and Wendy Orr, product manager at Guardian News & Media. The event is full, but there is a waiting list. Sign up here.

Girls in Tech London

The community aims to support and raise the visibility of women in technology, entrepreneurship and innovation. Their activities include monthly events and leadership programmes. They haven’t announced future events yet. To stay updated to their activities you can join their online community or their mailing list. Their latest event was about the intersection between dating and technology.

Google Women Techmakers

Women Techmakers is Google’s global program and brand for women in technology. It was kicked off in 2012 by Megan Smith, then VP of Google[x], a semi-secret facility inside the company. Now Women Techmakers is led by Natalie Villalobos and a global team of Googlers who are passionate about empowering women in technology through increased visibility, community, and resources. They host summits and meet ups around the world.

Next event: International Women’s Day Event in partnership with Google Women Techmakers”, Monday, 30 March.

To celebrate the International Women’s Day event, Google Women Techmakers partnered with Woman Who Code for a summit. The activities for this event haven’t been announced yet, but those interested in a place can apply now. Applications close on 20 February. 

W Kollective – Digitally Savvy Women

The community is dedicated to women in digital, technology and startups. The group, founded by Laurie Wang, has 332 members. Their goal is to inspire, educate, empower and create networking opportunities for women making their mark in the digital space. The community promotes talks, debates and parties.

Next event: Defining a Digital Content Strategy That Works“, Wednesday 11 March.

The event is designed for content and community managers who want to plan content in a more strategic way. The speaker is Nichola Stott, managing director of theMediaFlow. She will cover aspects as campaign planning, measuring success and good practices in content marketing.

Ladies that UX

The London chapter of Ladies that UX was set up in January 2014 and is part of the global Ladies that UX group. It works as a collaborative community of women looking forward to push the boundaries and promote the role of women within UX.

The chapter is led by Sophie Mitchell and Georgie Bottomley and is opened to those already working in UX or for those looking to make the move. Over a year, the global group has brought together more than 600 London Ladies at over 13 events including partnering with some of the top UX Conferences.

Monthly events include user-led talks, inspirational panel discussions, lightning talks, and workshops. According to the group, events have been planned up until the end of 2015. For those interested, email Ladies that UX at london@ladiesthatux.com to join their mailing list or follow them o Twitter at @LadiesthatUX_LN.

What female representation in Davos says about gender equality globally

pa_davos

Over the past week, as business leaders and heads of state from more than 100 countries gathered in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum, a recurrent question would appear in the press and social media: why so few women?

This year only 17 per cent of the 2,872 participants at the annual event were women. It’s not an exaggeration to say that Davos is still mostly a men’s club.

The industry with most female participants at Davos were “Public Sector, Civil Society, Arts, Academia”, with 28,41% of its participants being women. Other industries were “Media, Entertainment & Information” and “Banking & Capital Markets”.

Davos_Datawrapper

 

However, Davos is not alone. Women comprise less than a quarter of senior positions in corporations across the world. Only 3,4 per cent of the companies at the Fortune’s Global 500 have a women CEO, as showed in this chart by Fortune retweeted several times:

In an interview, Barri Rafferty, CEO of Ketchum North America, pondered how much the forum is merely a representation of the how the global leadership is designed at the moment:

“It is hard to blame the forum, but the event has become a bit of barometer of how women are doing in top roles in corporations, politics and NGOs. It is a moment in time when we can count the number of women and see how we are doing.”

Not surprisingly, gender parity was amongst the ten challenges for the global economy discussed at the meeting, amongst topics such as inequality, Internet of things and monetary policy.

In a report about gender equality last year, the World Economic Forum concluded that countries where women and men have equal opportunities have a higher GDP per capita, are more competitive and have better human development.

“People and talents are the key that drive most economies,” says the report. The benefit of gender equality, however, goes beyond the economic case. “Women are half of the population and half of the world’s population. Gender equality is a vital part of human progress.”

WEF has an incentive for executives to bring women. Leaders at the highest level of membership are offered four tickets to Davos to distribute to high profile employees. If one of the tickets goes to a woman who is an executive, the company receives a fifth ticket.

Such an incentive might start changing the gender landscape at Davos, which is great news. But the greatest impact will come from a more balanced representation of women in every level of management, in every industry.

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