The biggest problems with #TechSexism – here’s what you said

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The tech industry is struggling to overcome its problems with sexism in the workplace – both cultural and structural. Women are hugely underrepresented in all technical jobs, and a recent survey by The Guardian showed that 73 per cent of the people working in tech consider sexism to be a problem.

We asked you to share your experiences of sexism with us: What are the biggest issues? Here’s what you said, on the hashtag #TechSexism.

1. The sexist culture

Misogynistic jokes and not being taken seriously are both an unsurprising but unwelcome side effect of an industry with such a skewed gender balance. @blackgirltech described the cultural sexism as a problem:

The effects of a male-dominated workplace have been described by many of the women we’ve interviewed on Project Ada. City University lecturer Dr Simone Stumpf mentioned a brogramming culture she described as “casually misogynistic”.

Decoded’s Kathryn Parsons described something similar when we interviewed her in November.

“People still say to me ‘women’s brains don’t really work that way’. It happens every week. I won’t stop until I never hear that phrase again.”

2. The pay gap

One of our readers wanted us to highlight the gaping difference between men and women’s salaries.

And no wonder.

Here’s a bit of structural sexism that’s hard to ignore. Women in technical jobs only earn 73% of what their male colleagues earn, according to US organisation Narrow the Gapp.

3. Sexist and gendered products

Another reader called out needlessly gendered products. Especially when they’re also casually sexist.

Microsoft’s smart bra is supposed to prevent stress-related over-eating by detecting stress levels. (What they want male stress eaters to do is unclear).

This is the latest in a never-ending line of frankly incredible products. From Bic’s slimmer pens “for her” (finally, a pen my teeny tiny lady hands can grasp!) to extra feminine ear plugs or girls’ Lego (for an early start in gendering). Lady Geek, who campaign against this type of gendering, call this the “pink it shrink it” approach.

Thoughts? How do you think sexism affects the tech industry? Continue the conversation on #TechSexism!

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