Tag Archives: STEM

7 scholarships and grants for women in tech

money

It is widely known that women are underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, both in the academic world and in the market place.

Some initiatives, from the private sector, independent institutions and universities, try to tackle the gender gap in the STEM industry by providing financial support for women who show a passion for the hard sciences.

Project Ada has selected seven funding opportunities that are or will be open soon for submissions in the UK and abroad. If you are a woman in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, you may be eligible to one of these scholarships and grants:

1. Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship is aimed to fund female students in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, informatics or a closely related technical field. In the 2015-2016 academic year, the program awarded a € 7,000 award for the year.

Winners are awarded scholarships based on the strength of each candidate’s academic background, passion for increasing the involvement of women in computer science, and demonstrated leadership.

Award: a € 7,000 award for the year
Requirements: to apply it is necessary to intend to be enrolled in or accepted as a full-time student in a Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD program at a university in Europe, the Middle East or Africa.
Application date: open in Autumn 2015
More detailshttp://www.google.com/anitaborg

2. Most promising female applicant (STEM courses)

This generous scholarship by Bournemouth University, of a £9,000 tuition fee waiver, will be awarded to the most promising UK female applicant applying for a full-time undergraduate STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) course offered at BU.

Award: a £9,000 tuition fee waiver
Requirements: Be a female applicant for a full-time STEM subject undergraduate course delivered at Bournemouth University
Application date: close by 31 August 2015.
More detailshttp://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/futurestudents/undergraduate/funding/vc-scholarship-stem.html

3. Level Up

If you are looking for an opportunity to study in the US, this might be a good one. Level up fellowship is targeted for individuals from low-income backgrounds who have shown a passion for technology and a strong commitment to build a career in tech.

To apply, the candidate has to be referred by one of the following institutions: YerUp, Women Who Code, Npower, Per Scholas and Northern Virginia Family Service (NVFS).

Requirements: The program is for candidates accepted into Web Development Immersive (WDI) and User Design Experience Immersive (UXDI) courses in in New York City, San Francisco, or Washington DC.
Next deadline: 29 April for WDI in New York. 29 April for UXDI in NYC, SF and DC.
More details: https://generalassemb.ly/opportunity-fund/fellowships/level-up

4. Top entrepreneurship program with Draper University

The programme offers a seven-week Silicon Valley live-in entrepreneurship program for entrepreneurs aged 18-28 from all over the world.

The university has created more than 100 startups that have raised more than US$ 10 million, funded by investors including Marc Andreessen, Tim Draper, and Marc Benioff.

Award: The university provides one US$ 5.000 scholarship for women in STEM and one full scholarship for Women Who Code members.
Requirements: be an entrepreneur aged 18-28.
Application date: the second round for applications closes 1 May.
More details: http://draperuniversity.com

5. Delphix Technology Scholarship for Women

Delphix, the software company based in Palo Alto, California (US), is hosting a coding competition to get more women inside the company. The initiative is to help company to create a more diverse team. As the company says:

“At Delphix we believe that the best products are built by a diverse team of great engineers.”

Award: the winner receives $5,000 to be used toward tuition fee
Requirements: full-time college students pursuing a technical degree like computer science, mathematics, information technology, applied mathematics, electrical engineering etc in the US.
Application date: open from June 1, 2015 until November 15, 2015. Winner will be announced on December 11, 2015.
More details: http://scholarship.delphix.com

6. Conference: Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

Grace Hopper Celebration is awarding scholarships for its conference, the world’s largest technical conference for women in computing. The event is on Oct 14-16th, 2015 in Houston, Texas.

Undergraduate, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows from around the world are encouraged to apply.

Award: The GHC Scholarship Grants for students typically cover all expenses for attending the conferencing including conference registration, meals, lodging, and fixed amount of travel reimbursement funds.
Application date: close on Wednesday, April 15th
More details: http://anitaborg.org/awards-grants/ghc-scholarship-grants/

7. The Anita Borg Systers Pass-It-On (PIO) Awards

This award provides small grants for women over 18. According to the organisation, the awards “honour Anita Borg’s desire to create a network of  women technologists helping one another”.

The cash awards are intended as a means for women established in technological fields to support women seeking their place in the fields of technology. The program is called “Pass-It-On” because it comes with the moral obligation to “pass on” the benefits gained from the award.

Awards: open to women in all countries and range from US$ 500 to US$ 1000.
Requirements: any woman over 18 years old in or aspiring to be in the fields of computing can apply. Click here for details of projects accepted for grants.
Application date: 22 April 2015.

(Featured image: Anita Borg (January 17, 1949 – April 6, 2003), American computer scientist. Photo by Ignite. Also, woman making it rain by expresscredit.)

Cambridge and Oxford fail to attract female computer science students

cambridge university gender disparity

Less than one in five people enrolled on the UK’s top computer science programmes are female – and Oxford and Cambridge have fewer female computer science students than any other top university.

The technology industry is disproportionate from the educational level as it fails to attract females to enroll on its key courses, data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency reveals.

The UK’s top ten computer science programmes are 84.55 per cent male – with the worst performing university having nine times as many men than women.

Gender balance on top computer science courses

Out of the UK’s best computer science courses, University College London has the most female students. Of its 355 students, 95 are female, accounting for just over one in four graduates.

The Universities of Cambridge and Oxford are the worst for gender representation in computer science, with 10 and 10.5 per cent female students respectively.

Featured image: The University of Cambridge, Richie

The best London meetups for every woman in tech

Brynn Evans, design lead at Google, in an interview  with Women Techmakers

(Photo: Brynn Evans, design lead at Google, during an interview with Google Women Techmakers)

One of the best things about the Internet is how easy it makes for people to gather around a subject and work together. The Internet is great for sharing and for collaboration and meetups are even better for building a face-to-face community.

These meetings can be practical workshops, lightning talks or networking opportunities. For London-based readers, Project Ada has put together a list of five communities and four free meetups we know every tech girl would love to attend.

Here is our selection:

Women Who Code

This professional community gathers more than 20,000 women developers from 15 countries and its goal is to connect 1 million women in tech careers. Its meetup community in London has more than 900 coders and their events are aimed to put developers in touch with companies and to help non-developers who want to learn how to code. The events are exclusively for female participants.

Next event: “An Evening with Salesforce + Lightning Talks“, Wednesday, 25 February.

There will be speakers from the CRM software company Salesforce and lightning talks from guests speakers. Confirmed names include Nicola Aitken, an API integrations engineer at Geckoboard; and Claire Tran, a software engineer. Nicola will be talking about the things she wishes she had known before she started her first developer job. Claire will look into some techniques that can be applied to Ruby on Rails app.

Super Women at Twitter

The group, under the acronym SWAT, says its goal is to share content and resources to empower women to be leaders in the workforce around the world. You can stay updated with their work and events here.

Next event: “Super Women in Tech London“, Wednesday, 18th February.

A panel of tech leaders that will share their experiences and thoughts on issues faced by women in the industry. Some of the panelists are Alice Bentinck, co-founder of Entrepreneur First and Code First:Girls; and Wendy Orr, product manager at Guardian News & Media. The event is full, but there is a waiting list. Sign up here.

Girls in Tech London

The community aims to support and raise the visibility of women in technology, entrepreneurship and innovation. Their activities include monthly events and leadership programmes. They haven’t announced future events yet. To stay updated to their activities you can join their online community or their mailing list. Their latest event was about the intersection between dating and technology.

Google Women Techmakers

Women Techmakers is Google’s global program and brand for women in technology. It was kicked off in 2012 by Megan Smith, then VP of Google[x], a semi-secret facility inside the company. Now Women Techmakers is led by Natalie Villalobos and a global team of Googlers who are passionate about empowering women in technology through increased visibility, community, and resources. They host summits and meet ups around the world.

Next event: International Women’s Day Event in partnership with Google Women Techmakers”, Monday, 30 March.

To celebrate the International Women’s Day event, Google Women Techmakers partnered with Woman Who Code for a summit. The activities for this event haven’t been announced yet, but those interested in a place can apply now. Applications close on 20 February. 

W Kollective – Digitally Savvy Women

The community is dedicated to women in digital, technology and startups. The group, founded by Laurie Wang, has 332 members. Their goal is to inspire, educate, empower and create networking opportunities for women making their mark in the digital space. The community promotes talks, debates and parties.

Next event: Defining a Digital Content Strategy That Works“, Wednesday 11 March.

The event is designed for content and community managers who want to plan content in a more strategic way. The speaker is Nichola Stott, managing director of theMediaFlow. She will cover aspects as campaign planning, measuring success and good practices in content marketing.

Ladies that UX

The London chapter of Ladies that UX was set up in January 2014 and is part of the global Ladies that UX group. It works as a collaborative community of women looking forward to push the boundaries and promote the role of women within UX.

The chapter is led by Sophie Mitchell and Georgie Bottomley and is opened to those already working in UX or for those looking to make the move. Over a year, the global group has brought together more than 600 London Ladies at over 13 events including partnering with some of the top UX Conferences.

Monthly events include user-led talks, inspirational panel discussions, lightning talks, and workshops. According to the group, events have been planned up until the end of 2015. For those interested, email Ladies that UX at london@ladiesthatux.com to join their mailing list or follow them o Twitter at @LadiesthatUX_LN.

How altruism can help to get more women in STEM

NigeriaGirlsRIGHT

Altruism can play a role in making science, technology, engineering and mathematics more accessible to women.

Anne-Marie Imafidon, assistant vice-president at Deutsche Bank and founder of Stemettes, an organization to inspire girls to pursue careers in STEM areas, points out that, besides creativity, it is key to show women they are able to solve problems by using technology.

Imafidon says women can be great problem-solvers when empowered by STEM knowledge.

To make her point, the executive mentions initiatives such as the group of four girls in Nigeria that created a machine to convert urine into electricity and the three Irish girls who developed a project to tackle the global food crisis.

Listen to the Stemettes’ founder talking about the topic:

When asked why the tech industry should be aware of the gender gap, she says that all industries would benefit from having a more diverse workforce.

“We have big problems. And no offense, while the guys are chasing billions by making apps, you have to have someone who is actually using the great technology that we have to solve the problems we have, whether they are hunger, illiteracy or infrastructure.”

Listen to her talking about gender equality here:

More from this article

If you would like to know about the examples Imafidon mentioned in her interview, here are the links:

Meet the 11-year-old inventor of the ‘unbreakable cup

This woman invented a way to run 30 lab tests on only one drop of blood

Featured image: Nigeria girls that created a machine to convert urine into electricity. Credit to Erik Hersman

Tackling the gender gap in the tech industry starts at school

KIDS

The gender disparity in the tech industry starts earlier than people might think.

When looking to figures about the industry, it is not only that employers aren’t hiring women: girls are reluctant in choosing degrees in fields such as computer science and engineering.

The latest figures on women’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in the UK show that only 13% of all STEM jobs in the UK are occupied by women, according to a study by the Wise Campaign.

“Technology is so much about innovation, about how you apply skills to make things better. And women’s creativity and mindset, which is focused on solving problems, are not being considered technology,” says Torie Chilcott, CEO and co-founder of Rockabox Studios.

Chilcott believes that to get more women to the STEM areas it is necessary to emphasize the creative aspect of these areas.

“Creativity is not being taught at schools as an skill and the STEM areas are not being presented in an appealing way.

“It is necessary to stop the vertical subjects and start focusing on problem solving,” she says.

Watch Chilcott, winner of the “Woman of the Year” at the everywoman in Technology Awards 2014, talking about gender gap in the tech industry.

Photo credit: Nasa.

As it happened: What would the web look like if it was run by women?

WebWeWant

Ashley, Keila and Sam brought you live coverage of A Web For Her, an event that asked a simple question: What would the web look like if it was run by women?

Live Blog A Web For Her